THE PREFERENCE FOR THE USE OF HELVETICA AND FUTURA OVER THE FASHION INDUSTRY

The findings of their work have shown that all designers use exactly the same families of the typeface. The preference for the use of Helvetica and Futura is conspicuous over the advertising industry.

By Balthazar Malevolent

THE PREFERENCE FOR THE USE OF HELVETICA AND FUTURA OVER THE FASHION INDUSTRY

Every brand carries a certain level of emotional assets based on how the consumer feels about the brand experience. You can feel it straight away when looking at Rick Owens bag, Alexander Wang t-shirt or Yohji Yamamoto coat.

Brands that lately have opted for the all-caps sans-serif look.

The most direct representation of fashion brands is via their logotypes. Typography condenses and articulates the complexity of language into an understandable discurs, a kind of aesthetic psychology - a psychology that fashion, in particular, couldn't live without. Hence, the logotypes carry the core meaning behind a certain brand – the gist and essence – they are the visual representation of a brand’s name, design, symbolism or other feature that distinguishes it from others. A logotype has the task of distilling the values and ethos of a brand while remaining alluringly distinct and easily identifiable. The fashion industry is particularly skillful with its utilization of typography and, as such, has crafted it into an art form that has since helped define the latest trends.

The online magazine ‘SlamXHype’ conducted a survey of the typefaces and color schemes used in the logos of popular streetwear brands and high-end fashion houses. The findings of their work have shown that all designers use exactly the same families of the typeface. The preference for the use of Helvetica and Futura is conspicuous over the advertising industry. The explanation for the excessive use of these typeface families is – they are both clean, readable and versatile.For instance, Saint Laurent’s logo in Helvetica NeueBold, looks as elegant as it does on a jacket or stitched on the side of a bag. The oblique Futura logo by Nike validates the quality of a pair of running shoes and authenticates a classic basic hoodie, while the simplistic Chanel logo on the perfume bottle in a grandma's bathroom makes as much sense as it does on a brand-obsessed teenager's backpack.

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