Steven Kovacs: Atlantic Ocean’s Stunning Diversity

Photography from around the world, both land and underwater, showing the beauty of nature.

By Balthazar Malevolent

Steven Kovacs: Atlantic Ocean’s Stunning Diversity

Steven Kovacs was born in Canada and has always been fascinated by the underwater environment. In 2001, he bought his first camera and underwater housing and began diving in the chilly, rich waters off the coast of Vancouver Island. Later, the artist moved to Florida to pursue his passion in a more tropical setting. Kovacs had a significant interest in macro photography after that, with an emphasis on underwater behaviors.

After dusk, self-taught photographer Steven Kovacs dives into the open seas of Palm Beach to photograph minute, inconspicuous organisms floating in the depths. He's been making blackwater dives at 730 feet off Florida's eastern coast for the past eight years, a method that comprises "drifting near the surface at night from 0 to 100 feet over very deep water." The larval fish are photographed against a black background to highlight the most beautiful features of their bodies, such as wispy, translucent fins, iridescent traits, and bulbous eyes, which are typically noticed by humans.

Kovacs has no formal training in marine biology, he frequently enlists the help of scientists from all over the world to identify the strange fish he photographs. Three kinds of cusk eel, as well as the female blanket octopus, which is known for revealing a billowing membrane like the one shown above, are on his radar for future encounters.

Steven Kovacs
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