MATT THE NELSON: OPENINGS

Matt is an animator and designer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has had the opportunity to work for brands such as Apple, Google, and Disney.

By Balthazar Malevolent

MATT THE NELSON: OPENINGS

Matt The Nelson is a motion designer and artist. His work has been featured in the New York Times, Ello, and Gross Magazine.

"When I was first trying to break into the creative industry I thought “Matt Nelson” wasn’t very memorable or interesting. I started sending out resumes as Matt the Nelson and it got a lot of attention. One creative director thought it was my real name. Maybe one day I will make it my real name, and get it tattooed across my chest.

I began playing around with animation and design from a young age. My dad was a video enthusiast, and had a lot of media equipment he would let me play with. I would create these primitive stop-motion animations using his camera and basic editing software. This was before online video took off, so I would literally burn DVD’s and distribute them to all of my friends. By the time I graduated high school, I was set on working in the design and animation industry, so I ended up earning a BS in digital media and design. Following graduation, I began working full-time as a motion designer for commercials and advertising.

My influences include everything from industrial design, to occult imagery, and fashion. Those elements may or may not be obvious in my work, but the influence is there. Working quickly is also very important for me, so I try to keep the look very minimal and clean.

There’s a core group of artists in the motion design world that inspire me - Ash Thorp, Beeple, and GMUNK, to name a few. There’s also a number of fine artists I look up to, such as James Jean, Alexander McQueen, and Damien Hirst. I tend to be bipolar in my consumption of art: some weeks I go without looking at references at all, and other weeks I binge on consuming huge amounts of art.

For my day job I work at a media and advertising agency, so most of my time is spent on client projects. However, weekends and nights are dedicated to personal work. Once you start making money on client projects, it’s hard to focus on anything else, but carving out time for personal work is incredibly important. It often builds skill sets that you can use in other areas. The inverse happens as well - I’ll learn a new plugin or trick for a client project, and I end up using it for personal work. The relationship is symbiotic.

On a good day, I push myself to make work that’s insanely imaginative, weird, or captivating. Other times, I just crank out an image as quickly as possible. A lot of people have this notion that they can only create something when they feel inspired, but then they end up not creating very much at all. It’s more important to stay committed to your craft, even if you don’t feel like pushing the envelope, or putting in the work.

The Silicon Valley area has such an amazing culture that blends technology, art and design. In the same way that online video revolutionized advertising, VR will be the next breakthrough for digital creatives, and being in the Bay Area brings me one step closer to that."

Matt The Nelson

In other news, Rick Owens Fall 2021 fashion show. On the subject of underthings, the pentagram briefs from the January men’s show reappeared here wrapped around evening clutches, the implication being that these alien females had handled the “unhinged male aggression” that those briefs signified.

[object Object]
[object Object]
[object Object]
[object Object]
[object Object]
[object Object]
[object Object]
1 / 7

Shop now