MARQUISE DE POMPADOUR INSPIRED JAPANESE LOLITA DRESS

Yohji Yamamoto, as the designer himself said after his show, claimed inspiration from French singer Serge Gainsbourg, as "an image of a good-looking French man".

By Balthazar Malevolent

MARQUISE DE POMPADOUR INSPIRED JAPANESE LOLITA DRESS

In Lolita Fashion, Baby’s “Gingham Check Creeping Rose Dress” (2010), for instance, exudes an air of the mid-eighteenth-century robe à la française (French dress) style, which was characterized by hooped petticoats known as panniers. To emphasize this aspect, “the skirt was open in front to reveal a decorative petticoat,” even an “ordinary” robe à la française “was highly decorated, made of patterned silks covered in ribbons, ruffles, furbelows, and lace”. Baby’s cotton dress has sleeve flounces and an overall design that emulates the frilled robe à la française, with a matching petticoat on which white lace trims separate the skirts into three parts, as if the petticoat were in front.

Marquise de Pompadour, a famous mistress of French king Louis XV.

Another Lolita dress, designed by Innocent World, is called the “Pompadour Bustle Jumper Skirt.” Using a Rococo reference, “Pompadour” refers to Jeanne Poisson, known as the Marquise de Pompadour, a famous mistress of French king Louis XV, who was considered “the personification of the rococo in costume”. Accordingly, the échelle of three detachable ribbons placed vertically on the bodice of this twilled cotton dress corresponds with “the three-dimensional ornamentation of the [eighteenth century French] dress that was an essential part of the rococo”. Combined with the classical rose patterns and the robe à la française-style skirt, these qualities bear resemblances to the dress the marquise wears in her famous portraits by François Boucher. Garments such as the Pompadour Bustle Dress are likely to be worn with added layers of separately sold cotton organdy or tulle pannier to better form and accentuate the bell shape, all of which reinforces the feeling of the robe à la française, thus thoroughly mixing the design’s temporalities.

Interesting fact: Yohji Yamamoto, as the designer himself said after his show, claimed inspiration from French singer Serge Gainsbourg, as "an image of a good-looking French man".

No results

Shop now