Dutch Broadcaster Apologises After Showing Subtitles for German Anthem Words Before Euro 2020 Clash With England

The verse beginning 'Deutschland, Deutschland uber alles' was dropped in post-Second World War Germany due to its association with Nazi Germany.

By Balthazar Malevolent

Dutch Broadcaster Apologises After Showing Subtitles for German Anthem Words Before Euro 2020 Clash With England

NPO Dutch public broadcaster has issued an apology for the improper use of subtitles for the German national anthem launched before the 0-2 European Championship 2020 1/8 final match against England at Wembley in London.

The company said it had mistakenly put a verse referring to the time of Nazism in the subtitles of the German anthem. They apologised to viewers who were offended by the mistake.

The line "Deutschland, Deutschland über alles, über alles in der Welt" (usually translated into English as "Germany, Germany above all, above all in the world") was part of the German anthem, which was only used in the version between 1933 and 1945, when Adolf Hitler was in power, and has a reference to the Nazi party..

The version was no longer sung after World War II, as it was associated with Nazism. The channel has reportedly apologised for the incident, explaining that "the verse was shown accidentally".

"August Heinrich Hoffmann von Fallersleben wrote the text in 1841 on holiday on the North Sea island of Heligoland, then a possession of the United Kingdom (now part of Germany).

Hoffmann von Fallersleben intended "Das Lied der Deutschen" to be sung to Haydn's tune, as the first publication of the poem included the music. The first line, "Deutschland, Deutschland über alles, über alles in der Welt" (usually translated into English as "Germany, Germany above all, above all in the world"), was an appeal to the various German monarchs to give the creation of a united Germany a higher priority than the independence of their small states. In the third stanza, with a call for "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (unity and justice and freedom), Hoffmann expressed his desire for a united and free Germany where the rule of law, not monarchical arbitrariness, would prevail.

In the era after the Congress of Vienna, influenced by Metternich and his secret police, Hoffmann's text had a distinctly revolutionary and at the same time liberal connotation, since the appeal for a united Germany was most often made in connection with demands for freedom of the press and other civil rights. Its implication that loyalty to a larger Germany should replace loyalty to one's local sovereign was then a revolutionary idea.

The year after he wrote "Das Deutschlandlied", Hoffmann lost his job as a librarian and professor in Breslau, Prussia (now Wrocław, Poland), because of this and other revolutionary works, and was forced into hiding until being pardoned after the revolutions of 1848 in the German states."

Dutch Broadcaster Apologises After Showing Subtitles for German Anthem Words Before Euro 2020 Clash With England.
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