DARIUS PUIA AKA BAKAARTS: SURREAL, CYBERPUNK AND SCI-FI ART

Cyberpunk is a subgenre of science fiction in a dystopian futuristic setting that tends to focus on a "combination of lowlife and high tech" featuring advanced technological and scientific achievements, such as artificial intelligence and cybernetics, juxtaposed with a degree of breakdown or radical change in the social order.

By Balthazar Malevolent

DARIUS PUIA AKA BAKAARTS: SURREAL, CYBERPUNK AND SCI-FI ART

Darius Puia is a 30-year old Digital Art Designer based in Germany. Darius Puia designs and has a keen eye for modern & colorful types of artwork, however, prefers to test newer themes. Lately, Puia has been trying darker and grittier themes: taking on new design challenges and making ideas come to life.

The term "cyberarts" is vague and relatively new; nevertheless much of the work described by this term is rarely described any other way. For instance, a common type of cyberart which is produced programmatically by applying a set of design rules to a natural or preexisting process. A program could produce a few million such 'works of art' in a minute.

The word "CyberArts" is claimed as a registered trademark by Miller Freeman Inc., promoter of a series of muti-media technology conferences known as CyberArts International during the early 1990s.

″Recent works of bioart propose to connect the viewer, transformed into a user, with different biological organisms by pirating their biometric data using digital interfaces. These immersive aesthetic propositions are based on a plural conception of the human body, forged in the crucible of cybernetics. Their new modes of communication explore the alternative path of an ecological continuum where the user enters a becoming-cyborg, far from the classic representations of human-machine coupling. They encourage us to reconsider the notion of bioart, in favor of cyberart.″

The history of computer art predates the computer art scene for several decades, with the first experiments having taken place in the early 1950s. Devices like plotters and teletypewriters were commonly used instead of video display screens. The earliest precursors to ASCII art can be found in RTTY art, that is, pictures created by amateur radio enthusiasts with teleprinters using the Baudot code.

In the early days of microcomputers, what could be shown on a typical video display screen was limited to plain and simple text, such as that found in the ASCII code set. In the early 1980s, users of IBM PC compatible computers began to experiment with ways of forming simple pictures and designs using only the 255 characters within the Extended ASCII character set, specifically known as code page 437, created by IBM. Modems and networking technology allowed computer users to communicate with each other over bulletin board systems (BBSes); the operators of these BBSes used ASCII art to enhance the aesthetic appearance of their systems. The common user interface or video mode shared by all systems was plain text. As a result, a "scene" of artists arose to fill the need for original art to distinguish one BBS from another.

Darius Puia

In other news, Rick Owens Fall 2021 fashion show. On the subject of underthings, the pentagram briefs from the January men’s show reappeared here wrapped around evening clutches, the implication being that these alien females had handled the “unhinged male aggression” that those briefs signified.

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